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corewalking works


How I Found Relief from Pain— After Surgeries, Repeated Rounds of Physical Therapy and Countless Doctor’s Appointments— by Making a “Single” Change in my Daily Routine.

Even though nothing else had worked...

Jonathan FitzGordon, Founder

It is easier than you think to find
relief from crippling pain!

In my mid-thirties, my body broke down and I suffered a series of injuries that led to a number of surgeries.

Determined to recover and live an active life - and I will admit to having moments of doubt about that possibility - I went back to square one and learned how to walk and stand in a way that the body is designed.

I went on a search and eventually discovered the foundation of all my problems...

The Way I Walked Was Hurting Me.

That’s right, I had to learn how to walk and stand properly --- in the way that my body was designed. And what a revelation this was!

FACT : It isn't all that hard to make changes to the way you walk
and experience less pain, greater mobility, and better energy.

Walking is the best way to bring permanent change to the body—because we all do it, and we do it over and over again (Even the most sedentary person is takes 3k steps a day).

But the human body will accept any pattern we put into it whether that pattern is good or bad. This is how chronic injuries develop out of seemingly innocent or even unknown events. Injuries becomes chronic because your body adapts a new movement pattern due to unconscious compensations.

Learning to walk, or re-learning to walk allows you to re-pattern your body to move in the direction of your choice.

The CoreWalking Program Won't Fix You

We guide you to fix yourself because change that lasts must come from within.

Exercise and bodywork of all kinds are important but they are not ends unto themselves. A trip to the chiropractor or massage therapist is wasted if you aren’t working with them to bring changes to your body.

Walking Is A Means To Rebuild Yourself

Maybe you can relate to this... it's dinner time and you are cooking for your family, when all of a sudden you realize that you have been there too long and your back isn't happy.

And then the next move you make triggers a pain in your butt or send a shooting pain down your leg.

This is the scary reality for so many people these days.

People suffer back pain for all different reasons but the end results are often similar: the frustration of waking up to pain every morning; The disappointment when a treatment or medication doesn't work; the toll it takes on those around you, especially your closest family.

What would it mean to you to talk a long walk after dinner with you partner? Or to go out dancing? Or just sit in an easy chair and do nothing... without pain?

The depression associated with chronic pain can feed on itself leading to feelings of hopelessness and a belief that you won't ever return to the life you once had where the thought of something as simple going to the store didn't fill you with worry.

Who Taught You How To Walk?

The honest answer is no one. Somewhere around one year old you stood up, took a few steps to the cheers of your parents, if they happened to notice, and after than you were on your own.

Well there is a difference between walking and walking correctly.

This is an exaggeration of how you walk, even if you don't think so!

This is how we want to walk, moving forward working with gravity.

This is how we want to walk, moving forward working with gravity.

Did You Know There Is A Walking Muscle?

Deep in the core of the body lies the psoas major— a bridge between the legs and the spine— and the body’s most important muscle for three reasons.

  • The psoas is the muscle of walking.
    Every successful step you take is initiated by the psoas which facilitates a self healing pattern of movement. If you don't walk well you don't use the psoas to take advantage of this amazing design. 
     
  • The psoas is the muscle of standing.
    We are the only creatures that stand truly upright. We stand upright because of the lumbar curve which is created by the psoas when we begin to sit, crawl and stand. The psoas, connecting the legs to the spine at the front of the body, helps to hold the spine upright.
  • The psoas is the muscle of pain and trauma.
    Fear is flexion and as the body's main hip flexor the psoas is involved with all actions involving our fear response. When the brain and nervous system is confronted with an activity or energy it can't process in the moment, that energy is stored in the psoas and can lead to myriad forms of dysfunction and pain.

Releasing long held chronic pain and tension stored in the psoas while learning to use this amazing muscle correctly leads to incredible gains in health and healing.

So How Did I Stop Injuring Myself?

By putting one foot in front of the other!

And using the psoas muscle correctly.

Yes, it is that simple. We are designed to walk in a specific way and once I show you how to do this with simple easy to understand instructions your journey to pain free living begins immediately.

Fifteen years after my last knee surgery I am living the life of my dreams, hiking, skating, running and being as active as I'd like at the tender age of 55. 

I promise you that it is easy to get out of pain. In fact, I guarantee it.

Who Taught You How To Walk?

The honest answer is no one. Somewhere around one year old you stood up, took a few steps to the cheers of your parents, if they happened to notice, and after than you were on your own.

Well there is a difference between walking and walking correctly.

This is an exaggeration of how you walk, even if you don't think so!

This is how we want to walk, moving forward working with gravity.

This is how we want to walk, moving forward working with gravity.

Did You Know There Is A Walking Muscle?

Deep in the core of the body lies the psoas major— a bridge between the legs and the spine— and the body’s most important muscle for three reasons.

  • The psoas is the muscle of walking.
    Every successful step you take is initiated by the psoas which facilitates a self healing pattern of movement. If you don't walk well you don't use the psoas to take advantage of this amazing design. 
     
  • The psoas is the muscle of standing.
    We are the only creatures that stand truly upright. We stand upright because of the lumbar curve which is created by the psoas when we begin to sit, crawl and stand. The psoas, connecting the legs to the spine at the front of the body, helps to hold the spine upright.
  • The psoas is the muscle of pain and trauma.
    Fear is flexion and as the body's main hip flexor the psoas is involved with all actions involving our fear response. When the brain and nervous system is confronted with an activity or energy it can't process in the moment, that energy is stored in the psoas and can lead to myriad forms of dysfunction and pain.

Releasing long held chronic pain and tension stored in the psoas while learning to use this amazing muscle correctly leads to incredible gains in health and healing.

Did You Know There Is A Walking Muscle?

Deep in the core of the body lies the psoas major— a bridge between the legs and the spine— and the body’s most important muscle for three reasons.

  • Wake up without pain ready to attack a new day.
  • Take an exercise or yoga class without fear of suffering for it later in the day.
  • Get back to the active lifestyle you thought was gone forever.